As You Wish

I watched The Princess Bride for the first time when I was little, maybe sometime around 1990. I’m not sure when. I’m also not sure about how many times I’ve seen it since then. Enough that, like many others, I can quote the movie just about line for line. I was excited when I first heard that Cary Elwes was publishing a memoir of his experiences on the set of The Princess Bride, but like many things, it got pushed aside by life. But I saw it at the library last week, and immediately picked it up. I’m about 150 pages into it, and the book so far has been thoroughly charming and everything I had hoped for- descriptions of a beautiful lady (and how smart and wonderful she is, too), recollections of giants, the secrets of the Fire Swamp, as well as catering fails, learning the art of the sword from two masters, and Elwes’s own nervousness at being cast as the lead in the movie version of one of his favorite books.

Here’s the list for this week:

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I finished The Evil Hours by David J. Morris a week or so ago. I had initially thought it was a soldier’s memoir of dealing with PTSD, but I was mistaken. While Morris was indeed a Marine in the 1990s, he went to Iraq as an journalist, and that’s where incident that caused his PTSD occurred. While the book is indeed part memoir, it’s also an investigation into the history of PTSD, as well as the treatments (or lack thereof) that have been recommended for it through the years. While the book speaks primarily about the experience of veterans (as that’s where most of the research has been), Morris does talk about the experience of rape victims. This is a beautifully written book about a frightening subject.

I picked up Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things downtown at my favorite used bookstore. I’ve heard about it on multiple occasions, but had never gotten around to reading. I’ve since forgotten what it’s about, and the back cover isn’t helpful, since it’s just a list of accolades from various publications. But the bookstore’s owner couldn’t sing enough of its praises, so it came home with me.

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